POLICE FACTS & FIGURES

There are approximately 850,000 sworn law enforcement officers now serving in the United States, which is the highest figure ever. About 14 percent of those officers are female.

In 2001, there were over 1.4 million violent crimes committed in the United States (according to the National Crime Victimization Survey conducted by the Bureau of Justice Statistics). The annual number of violent crimes has declined by 35 percent since it peaked in 1993 at four million.

Crime fighting has taken its toll. Since the first recorded police death in 1792, there have been more than 16,000 law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty.

A total of 1,655 law enforcement officers died in the line of duty during the last 10 years, an average of one death every 53 hours or 165 per year. There were 148 Law Enforcement officers killed in 2002.

On average, more than 56,000 law enforcement officers are assaulted each year, resulting in some 16,000 injuries.

The deadliest year in law enforcement history was 1974 when 271 officers were killed. The deadliest decade was the 1970s when a total of 2,240 officers died, or 224 each year. That figure dropped dramatically in the 1990s to 157 per year.

The deadliest day in law enforcement history was September 11, 2001, when 72 officers were killed while responding to the terrorist attacks on America.

New York City has lost more officers in the line of duty than any other department, with 576 deaths. California has lost 1,334 officers, more than any other state. The state with the fewest deaths is Vermont, with 15.

There are 866 federal officers on the Memorial, as well as 436 correctional officers and 44 military law enforcement officers.

There are 188 female officers listed on the Memorial, only nine of whom were killed prior to 1970.

During the last 10 years, more officers were killed feloniously on Fridays than any other day of the week. The fewest number of felonious fatalities occurred on Sundays. More officers were killed between 8:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. than during any other two-hour period over the past decade.

Police Facts & Figures – state-by-state.

On average, one law enforcement officer is killed somewhere in America every 53 hours. The first known line-of-duty death occurred in 1792, when New York’s Deputy Sheriff Isaac Smith was shot and killed. Since then, over 16,000 officers have died while performing their duties. New York City has lost more officers than any other department, with more than 576 deaths. The state with the highest number of police deaths is California, with more than 1,334. Vermont has the fewest deaths, with 15. A complete state-by-state breakdown follows.

ALABAMA 401 NEBRASKA 99
ALASKA 40 NEVADA 65
ARIZONA 218 NEW HAMPSHIRE 29
ARKANSAS 195 NEW JERSEY 407
CALIFORNIA 1334 NEW MEXICO 119
COLORADO 218 NEW YORK 1128
CONNECTICUT 121 NORTH CAROLINA 364
DELAWARE 31 NORTH DAKOTA 44
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 116 OHIO 679
FLORIDA 603 OKLAHOMA 324
GEORGIA 459 OREGON 155
HAWAII 43 PENNSYLVANIA 657
IDAHO 49 RHODE ISLAND 39
ILLINOIS 881 SOUTH CAROLINA 247
INDIANA 322 SOUTH DAKOTA 43
IOWA 129 TENNESSEE 343
KANSAS 212 TEXAS 1085
KENTUCKY 320 UTAH 95
LOUISIANA 331 VERMONT 15
MAINE 76 VIRGINIA 313
MARYLAND 241 WASHINGTON 240
MASSACHUSETTS 277 WEST VIRGINIA 137
MICHIGAN 502 WISCONSIN 219
MINNESOTA 196 WYOMING 44
MISSISSIPPI 178 TERRITORIES 323
MISSOURI 580 FEDERAL AGENCIES 866
MONTANA 107 MILITARY 44

 

TOTAL: 16,304 Figures updated 6/11//03


Definitions of Crimes

Criminal homicide
a. Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter the willful (nonnegligent) killing of one human being by another. Deaths caused by negligence, attempts to kill, assaults to kill, suicides, accidental deaths, and justifiable homicides are excluded. Justifiable homicides are limited to (1) the killing of a felon by a law enforcement officer in the line of duty; and (2) the killing of a felon, during the commission of a felony, by a private citizen.
b. Manslaughter by negligence the killing of another person through gross negligence. Traffic fatalities are excluded. While manslaughter by negligence is a Part I crime, it is not included in the Crime Index.

Forcible rape
The carnal knowledge of a female forcibly and against her will. Included are rapes by force and attempts or assaults to rape. Statutory offenses (no force used – victim under age of consent) are excluded.

Robbery
The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.

Aggravated assault
An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm. Simple assaults are excluded.

Burglary
breaking or entering-The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. Attempted forcible entry is included.

Larceny-theft (except motor vehicle theft)
The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another. Examples are thefts of bicycles or automobile accessories, shoplifting, pocket-picking, or the stealing of any property or article which is not taken by force and violence or by fraud. Attempted larcenies are included. Embezzlement, confidence games, forgery, worthless checks, etc., are excluded.

Motor vehicle theft
The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. A motor vehicle is self-propelled and runs on the surface and not on rails. Specifically excluded from this category are motorboats, construction equipment, airplanes, and farming equipment.

Arson
Any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, publicbuilding, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc.

Other assaults (simple)
Assaults and attempted assaults where no weapon is used and which do not result in serious oraggravated injury to the victim.

Forgery and counterfeiting
Making, altering, uttering, or possessing, with intent to defraud, anything false in thesemblance of that which is true. Attempts are included.

Fraud
Fraudulent conversion and obtaining money or property by false pretenses. Confidence games and bad checks,except forgeries and counterfeiting, are included.

Embezzlement
Misappropriation or misapplication of money or property entrusted to one’s care, custody, or control.

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing
Buying, receiving, and possessing stolen property, including attempts.

Vandalism
Willful or malicious destruction, injury, disfigurement, or defacement of any public or private property, real orpersonal, without consent of the owner or persons having custody or control. Attempts are included.

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.
All violations of regulations or statutes controlling the carrying, using, possessing,furnishing, and manufacturing of deadly weapons or silencers. Attempts are included.

Prostitution and commercialized vice
Sex offenses of a commercialized nature, such as prostitution, keeping a bawdyhouse, procuring, or transporting women for immoral purposes. Attempts are included.

Sex offenses (except forcible rape, prostitution, and commercialized vice)
Statutory rape and offenses against chastity, common decency, morals, and the like. Attempts are included.

Drug trafficking
State and/or local offenses relating to the unlawful sale, cultivation, and manufacturing of controlled substances.

Drug possession
State and/or local offenses relating to the unlawful possession and use of controlled substances.

Gambling
Promoting, permitting, or engaging in illegal gambling.

Offenses against the family and children
Nonsupport, neglect, desertion, or abuse of family and children. Attempts are included.

Driving under the influence
Driving or operating any vehicle or common carrier while drunk or under the influence ofliquor or narcotics.

Liquor laws
State and/or local liquor law violations except drunkenness and driving under the influence. Federal violations are excluded.

Drunkenness
Offenses relating to drunkenness or intoxication. Driving under the influence is excluded.

Disorderly conduct
Breach of the peace.

Vagrancy
Begging, loitering, etc. Includes prosecutions under the charge of suspicious person

All other offenses
All violations of state and/or local laws except those listed above and traffic offenses.

Suspicion
No specific offense; suspect released without formal charges being placed.

Curfew and loitering laws
(persons under age 18) Offenses relating to violations of local curfew or loitering ordinanceswhere such laws exist.

Runaways
(persons under age 18) Limited to juveniles taken into protective custody under provisions of local statutes.



FACTS & FIGURES National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund
www.nleomf.com/

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